Here you can browse through our very detailed pages for every episode of “Ghosts“. Each page will contain a summary, trivia, quotes, script, a look at Samantha’s style, behind the scenes information and more wherever it’s available. You can easily navigate from one episode to another by clicking the tabs below.

Season 1

A young couple inherit a country mansion. They move in and plan to turn it into a bed and breakfast. However, the house is also occupied by ghosts, who are dead set against the idea.
Episode name: Pilot
Directed by: Trent O'Donnell
Written by: Joe Port & Joe Wiseman
Original airdate: October 7, 2021
Viewers: 5.52 millions
Filming locations: Montréal, Québec, Canada

Photos & Media


Episode Reviews

Ghosts is a charming comedy featuring all-in performers who play things bold and broad, but not so much that they don't leave room for wit and some spot-on one-liners. Yes, there's a cringe sketch show vibe to some of the ghostly stereotypes but you might be surprised how well the phantoms are presented for comedy's sake. The ghosts all have their somewhat narrow lanes, but combined, the lanes comprise a freeway of free-spirited fun. And human leads Rose McIver and Utkarsh Ambudkar only add to the mirth and absurdity. - IGN (Full Review Here)
McIver and Ambudkar, whose character is much less convincingly defined, bicker and flirt in believable and agreeable ways. Ambudkar stretches some humor out of Jay’s not-overplayed skepticism, though it’s hard to feel like Ghosts is getting full value out of his varied skill set. Oh, and how do you make a number of very, very stale jokes about Hamilton in a sitcom featuring the musical’s original Aaron Burr (workshop, pre-Broadway) without finding a way to make that part of the gag? As for the rest of the ghosts, the performances are all fine and all quickly stagnating. It’s not a great sign that I’ve gotten more laughs out of the nameless, sleazily creepy ghosts in the cellar than from the featured spirits. The third Ghosts episode is a big test, because it’s the first to deviate entirely from the source material. I can’t tell if it’s good or bad that this half-hour is essentially more of the same, neither disappointingly stripped of its original voice nor encouragingly refined in its new voice. It’s amusing, instantly disposable and carried by McIver and Ambudkar. Nothing here is bad enough to be a deal-breaker, but Ghosts won’t be able to sustain my interest on “good bones” forever. - The Hollywood Reporter (Full Review Here)
In its first couple episodes, however, CBS’ “Ghosts” hew so close to the BBC’s that entire scenes are repeated almost verbatim. It’s admittedly rare for a sitcom to find its feet as quickly as the American “Ghosts” does, no doubt because it’s got a fairly malleable outline to follow that’s already proven successful. So while it’s genuinely jarring to watch this iteration of “Ghosts” if you’ve seen its British inspiration, if you have not … well, it’s charming enough to merit sticking around, anyway, especially as it begins to find its own way in a third episode completely divorced from the show’s source material. As in the original series, CBS’ “Ghosts” follows a young couple to a crumbling manse left behind by a distant relative. Sick of the high cost of living in a city, Samantha (Rose McIver) dreams of turning the estate into a bed and breakfast, while her skeptical husband Jay (Utkarsh Ambudkar) does his best not to doubt her. When a freak accident enables Samantha to see and hear the collection of ghosts stranded in the house, she has to figure out what to believe and, more difficult still, how to live alongside these extremely chatty new presences in her life. Some ghosts — like Richie Moriarty’s Boy Scout leader Pete and Rebecca Wisocky’s snooty grand dame Hetty — have direct roots in the original series. Others — like Brandon Scott Jones’ Revolutionary War veteran Isaac, Devan Chandler Long’s Viking, and Asher Grodman’s Wall Street jerk Trevor — are recognizable twists on their predecessors, with Jones’ pitch perfect histrionics making Isaac an early standout. Most interesting, but not coincidentally the least fleshed out, are entirely new ghosts like Danielle Pinnock’s dramatic flapper singer Alberta, Sheila Carrasco’s wayward hippie Flower, and Román Zaragoza’s deadpan Native American. Each of these characters represents a very specific new American archetype for the show to explore, and will hopefully get a greater chance to do so in episodes yet to come. - Variety

Samantha's Style

Trivia and Goofs

  • Continuity: When Jay leaves the bathroom, it is located at the end of the hall from the stairs, and he joins Samantha in the bedroom by the stairs. After their fight, Samantha leaves the bedroom by the door previously set up as the bathroom and heads to stairs previously established as right by the stairs.

Graphics

Here's a selection of our graphics from the first episode of "Ghosts". To view all our avatar from the episode, click here. To view all graphics from Ghosts in general (wallpapers, avatars, banners, GIFs and more), click here.

Episode Promo

After falling down the stairs and suffering a concussion, Sam now sees the ghosts but believes she is seeing things. The ghosts try to think of ways to convince her they really are there.
Episode name: Hello!
Directed by: Trent O'Donnell
Written by: Joe Port & Joe Wiseman
Original airdate: October 7, 2021
Viewers: 5.52 millions
Filming locations: Montréal, Québec, Canada

Photos & Media

Episode Reviews

Ghosts is a charming comedy featuring all-in performers who play things bold and broad, but not so much that they don't leave room for wit and some spot-on one-liners. Yes, there's a cringe sketch show vibe to some of the ghostly stereotypes but you might be surprised how well the phantoms are presented for comedy's sake. The ghosts all have their somewhat narrow lanes, but combined, the lanes comprise a freeway of free-spirited fun. And human leads Rose McIver and Utkarsh Ambudkar only add to the mirth and absurdity. - IGN (Full Review Here)
McIver and Ambudkar, whose character is much less convincingly defined, bicker and flirt in believable and agreeable ways. Ambudkar stretches some humor out of Jay’s not-overplayed skepticism, though it’s hard to feel like Ghosts is getting full value out of his varied skill set. Oh, and how do you make a number of very, very stale jokes about Hamilton in a sitcom featuring the musical’s original Aaron Burr (workshop, pre-Broadway) without finding a way to make that part of the gag? As for the rest of the ghosts, the performances are all fine and all quickly stagnating. It’s not a great sign that I’ve gotten more laughs out of the nameless, sleazily creepy ghosts in the cellar than from the featured spirits. The third Ghosts episode is a big test, because it’s the first to deviate entirely from the source material. I can’t tell if it’s good or bad that this half-hour is essentially more of the same, neither disappointingly stripped of its original voice nor encouragingly refined in its new voice. It’s amusing, instantly disposable and carried by McIver and Ambudkar. Nothing here is bad enough to be a deal-breaker, but Ghosts won’t be able to sustain my interest on “good bones” forever. - The Hollywood Reporter (Full Review Here)
In its first couple episodes, however, CBS’ “Ghosts” hew so close to the BBC’s that entire scenes are repeated almost verbatim. It’s admittedly rare for a sitcom to find its feet as quickly as the American “Ghosts” does, no doubt because it’s got a fairly malleable outline to follow that’s already proven successful. So while it’s genuinely jarring to watch this iteration of “Ghosts” if you’ve seen its British inspiration, if you have not … well, it’s charming enough to merit sticking around, anyway, especially as it begins to find its own way in a third episode completely divorced from the show’s source material. As in the original series, CBS’ “Ghosts” follows a young couple to a crumbling manse left behind by a distant relative. Sick of the high cost of living in a city, Samantha (Rose McIver) dreams of turning the estate into a bed and breakfast, while her skeptical husband Jay (Utkarsh Ambudkar) does his best not to doubt her. When a freak accident enables Samantha to see and hear the collection of ghosts stranded in the house, she has to figure out what to believe and, more difficult still, how to live alongside these extremely chatty new presences in her life. Some ghosts — like Richie Moriarty’s Boy Scout leader Pete and Rebecca Wisocky’s snooty grand dame Hetty — have direct roots in the original series. Others — like Brandon Scott Jones’ Revolutionary War veteran Isaac, Devan Chandler Long’s Viking, and Asher Grodman’s Wall Street jerk Trevor — are recognizable twists on their predecessors, with Jones’ pitch perfect histrionics making Isaac an early standout. Most interesting, but not coincidentally the least fleshed out, are entirely new ghosts like Danielle Pinnock’s dramatic flapper singer Alberta, Sheila Carrasco’s wayward hippie Flower, and Román Zaragoza’s deadpan Native American. Each of these characters represents a very specific new American archetype for the show to explore, and will hopefully get a greater chance to do so in episodes yet to come. - Variety

Graphics

Here's a selection of our graphics from the first episode of "Ghosts". To view all our avatar from the episode, click here. To view all graphics from Ghosts in general (wallpapers, avatars, banners, GIFs and more), click here.

Trivia & Goofs

  • Sam goes down to the basement and finds Jay surrounded by ghosts and says: "OMG ... there's a bunch of zombies down here!" A little wink to her spell as a zombie on iZombie (2015-2019) perhaps?.
  • Goof: Jay accidentally makes a large hole in Hetty's bedroom wall. When he does this, there is no sign of the wood laths that should now be visible. Laths (tiny strips of wood that run horizontally across from wood beam to beam) were used in old homes to give something for plaster to adhere to so that a finished wall could be produced. No laths means modern day Sheetrock was used, which shouldn't be there.
  • The second episode was shot in August 2021, almost 8 months after they filmed the pilot (December 2020)!

Episode Promo

When Thorfinn's bones are discovered on the property, he asks Sam to conduct the traditional Viking funeral he's always wanted; Sam and Jay are torn when they learn that the bones could be sold to a museum for a lot of much-needed cash.


Episode name: Viking Funeral
Directed by: Trent O'Donnell
Written by: Josh Malmuth
Original airdate: October 14, 2021
Viewers: 5.27 millions
Filming locations: Montréal, Québec, Canada

Photos & Media







Episode Reviews

TellTaleTV | Ghosts puts the fun back in funeral with an episode centering on loveable Viking Thorfinn. As far as second impressions go, Ghosts Season 1 Episode 3, “Viking Funeral,” threatens to keep the good times going with another strong installment. It is a sequel dying to impress us with its spooky shenanigans as we dive headfirst into grave robberies and firey burials. This beautiful baby sitcom continues to thrive as it takes its first few steps into the network comedy world, thanks to a roster of killer jokes and clashing personalities.

Some comedies adapt to the notion that every episode needs new dynamics and funnier ground to tread. However, Brooklyn Nine-Nine has proved circling back to the same iconic jokes until you beat them dead into the ground is still pretty damn hilarious. Ghosts shares promising similarities to the cop comedy with a running commentary of spiteful remarks and callbacks viewers learn about secondhand — like Trevor telling the other ghosts that the modern term for going to heaven is “getting sucked off.” I swear Trevor is Schmidt if he died before he put a dollar in the douchebag jar. None the less the humor of this character-driven sitcom carries the essence of Brooklyn Nine Nine‘s pettier Halloween Heist episodes and promises it has a long memory when it comes to the jokes that haunt us. (Read full review here)


Crave YouTV | Ghosts continued exploring the relations between the dead (the ghosts) and the living (Sam) on Ghosts Season 1 Episode 3. One could only imagine that an episode titled “Viking Funeral” would say goodbye to the beloved Thor. Thankfully, that wasn’t the case, but he was finally able to get the “proper” sendoff he never received. Efforts to reconstruct the fountain outside of the property unearthed human remains belonging to the Viking When the construction worker explained that he would have to report the finding to the county, he made it very clear that the process would not only be costly but also very time-consuming. That’s when Sam suggested that they simply get rid of the bones and fulfill Thor’s request of setting them on fire on the pond. No bones = no investigation. Everyone wins. That is until the construction worker told Jay that if they were authentic Viking bones, they could be worth a large sum of money. Jay suggested that they double back and sell the bones to the museum that expressed interest. With debts piling up due to renovations, Sam couldn’t resist. Naturally, that didn’t sit well with the big guy, which allowed us to dig further into his backstory. Thor told Sam that all he ever wanted was a “Viking funeral,” which he didn’t get because he was abandoned by his Viking brothers. Upon learning that he was betrayed by those he trusted and left behind only to get electrocuted due to his metal helmet was heartbreaking. And it was further heartbreaking that he now felt that Sam and Jay were abandoning him as well. (Read full review here)


TV Shows Finder | The fall season ushered in a handful of new pilots including CBS’s Ghosts, an adaptation of the British comedy of the same name. The premise is fresh and intriguing, so it’s not entirely shocking that CBS wanted to embrace it as an American comedy, but you have to wonder why they chose to blatantly copy the original instead of letting it serve as inspiration. I haven’t watched the BBC One sitcom, but based on the trailer, it’s evident that CBS opted for “copy and paste” rather than “making it your own.” It’s a strange choice considering the original got such astounding reviews. Why mess with perfection? Why remake something that already exists? Admittedly, however, the Rose McIver-led drama fills a void left behind by The Good Place, yet another brilliant 20-minute existential comedy). And if there’s anyone who can sell us on the belief that she can see dead people, it’s the woman who ate brains in order to solve crimes on iZombie. A more perfect role doesn’t exist for McIver, who flawlessly takes on the character of Sam, a young woman who inherits the Woodstone Mansion after the Great Aunt passes away. Sam’s impulsive nature tells her to give the rundown home a little TLC and turn it into a bed and breakfast, which doesn’t exactly sit well with her boyfriend Jay. He approaches the idea with an open mind, but he’s a bit more realistic in terms of how much TLC this place actually needs. (Read full review)

Samantha's Style



Trivia & Goofs

  • Sasappis is partially correct in his assertion that Native Americans invented popcorn, it actually originated in Peru but didn't become popular until the 19th century when Charles Cretors invented a popcorn machine in Chicago.

  • What is commonly considered a "Viking funeral" (canoe sent adrift, arrow set ablaze) is not a real thing. Vikings either buried or cremated and buried their dead.


Episode Promo

Sam and Jay invite Henry and Margaret to a dinner party to woo them into allowing the bed and breakfast; the ghosts are desperately eager to be included on the guest list.

Episode name: Dinner Party
Directed by: Trent O'Donnell
Written by: John Blickstead & Trey Kollmer
Original airdate: October 21, 2021
Viewers: 5.20 millions
Filming locations: Montréal, Québec, Canada

Photos & Media







Episode Reviews

TellTaleTV | Ghosts Season 1 Episode 4, “Dinner Party,” gives the most iconic episode of The Office a run for its money with the addition of a killer guest list. There’s nothing sitcom fans love more than a cringy dinner party, and while Ghosts lacks Jan and Michael’s unhinged presence, it creates its own chaos with the one thing this house has an abundance of — petty dead people. This masterstroke episode showcases the worst of its sequestered characters and the best parts of this poltergeist-filled premise. Nosy neighbors, tattling ghosts, and a testosterone-fueled light show make for a night we won’t soon forget.

These ghosts enjoy making each other’s lives hell and I enjoy watching them do it. The request from Samatha to keep all ghosts away from the dinner table spirals beautifully into Hetty deciding she will finalize the guestlist for a meal she isn’t invited to. The woman goes as far as to hire Thorfinn as muscle to keep Trevor out — the pettiness here is next level. It’s precisely these kinds of unnecessary and delusional power struggles that make Ghosts absolutely to die for. Like The Office‘s iconic “Dinner Party” episode, the lack of care towards its guests leads this mundane outing down exciting avenues. If Sam is ignoring them, the spirits panic and get louder. If Trevor enters the room unannounced, Thorfinn must wrestle him to the ground. It’s all set to a lovely montage of screaming, light-flickering mayhem that cuts away to a quiet meal as the lights flicker overhead. The jarring nature of chaos to quiet continues to maximize this show’s laughability long after the joke has landed. (Read full review here)


Crave YouTV | Dinner parties tend to be awkward, but it helps to have the undead as “uninvited” guests to move things along. On Ghosts Season 1 Episode 4, Sam learned just how fortunate she is to have a group of ghosts having her back. Sam and Jay hosted a dinner party in order to warm up to their neighbors, the Farnsby’s, a wealthy married couple that was adamantly against signing off on a permit allowing the couple to turn their inherited mansion into a B&B. They took issue with the fact that Sam and Jay were “young” and assumed that they would turn the place into a “rock n’ roll hotel,” which wasn’t the plan in the slightest. Now, it’s not hard to see why Sam dind’t want the ghosts in attendance. They’re a rowdy and opinionated bunch, so naturally, it’s hard to focus on the task at hand. It didn’t help that Pete aka “Arrow Guy” got up in Sam’s face and kept saying her name until she responded. All their snide-side comments kept getting a rise out of Sam, but she played them all off pretty incredibly. The Farnsby’s likely thought she was a little eccentric, sure, but it’s better than admitting that she can see several ghosts that inhabited the house over hundreds of years. Sam eventually lost her cool and banished all the ghosts to their quarters by pointing out that she was alive and they weren’t. There’s nothing that’ll bring a ghost’s spirits down like reminding them that they aren’t alive. The A word — as we all learned — is not allowed in the house. (Read full review here)



Samantha's Style



Trivia & Goofs

  • Sasappis (the First Nations apparition) does not appear in this episode.
  • The dinner guests, Henry and Maragaret, was played by Mark Linn-Baker and Kathryn Greenwood.


Episode Promo

The ghosts try to help Sam and Jay protect their home from the neighborhood kids who annually vandalize the house on Halloween.

Episode name: Halloween
Directed by: Katie Locke O'Brien
Written by: Talia Bernstein
Original airdate: October 28, 2021
Viewers: TBD
Filming locations: Montréal, Québec, Canada

Photos & Media







Episode Reviews


Samantha's Style


Trivia & Goofs



Episode Promo

Back to previous page